LTFRB Orders PUV Drivers & Conductors to Wear Masks via Memo Circular 2020-005

The Land Transportation Franchising and Regulatory Board (LTFRB) Ordered all Public Utility Vehicles (PUV) drivers and their conductors to wear face masks as safety precautions amid the growing threat of the 2019 novel coronavirus as they released a memorandum circular.


Memorandum Circular 2020-005 was released by the LTFRB, which mandates all PUV drivers and conducors "to properly wear face masks at all times while on duty," and for all franchise holders to ensure its compliance.



The LTFRB memo also mandates all terminal operators in the country to ensure proper sanitation and cleanliness in their premises to avoid the spread of the new strains of coronavirus.

PUV operators are also ordered by the LTFRB to provide free face masks as well as to make available disinfectant or sanitizer dispensers to its passengers.

The Department of Health confirmed on Thursday, January 30, 2020 the country’s first case of novel coronavirus. The patient is a 38-year-old female from Wuhan, China.

According to the World Health Organization (WHO) the Coronavirus (CoV) are a large family of viruses that cause illness ranging from the common cold to more severe diseases such as Middle East Respiratory Syndrome (MERS-CoV) and Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome (SARS-CoV). A novel coronavirus (nCoV) is a new strain that has not been previously identified in humans.



The 2019 Novel Coronavirus (2019-nCoV) is also known as Wuhan pneumonia or Wuhan coronavirus because it was first discovered in the City of Wuhan, Hubei Province of China. Wuhan is the capital of Hubei Province in China, also considered as the largest city in province with a population of over 11 million inhabitants. Wuhan City is considered as the political, economic, financial, commercial, cultural and educational center of Central China.

The WHO explained further that coronavirus are zoonotic, meaning they are transmitted between animals and people. The name "coronavirus" is derived from Latin corona, meaning crown or halo, which refers to the characteristic appearance of the virus particles (virions): they have a fringe reminiscent of a royal crown or of the solar corona. 

Common signs of infection include respiratory symptoms, fever, cough, shortness of breath and breathing difficulties. In more severe cases, infection can cause pneumonia, severe acute respiratory syndrome, kidney failure and even death.


Source: SunStar Cebu / WHO

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